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Organizational Role Stress In Relation To Teaching Experiences

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Organizational Role Stress In Relation To Teaching Experience

Abstract

The present paper studied the organizational role stress in teaching profession. Due to technological advancements, the burden on teacher’s part is now going to increase day by day. The investigator studied organizational role stress in college teachers with a sample of 200 to find out the organizational role stress in context of teaching experience. Descriptive survey method was used for the investigation with the use of organizational role stress scale by Udai Pareek (1982). The finding of the study was that there is significant relationship between organizational role stress and teaching experience in college teachers.

Introduction:

Term “stress” was first used by Selye (1936) in the literature on life sciences, describing stress as “the force, pressure, or strain exerted upon a material object or person which resist these forces and attempt to maintain its original state.” Stress is that kind of force in which an individual’s psychological and physical state deviates from the normal functioning (Beehr and Newman, 1978). Stress now a days is not a hidden phenomenon but it is spreading and exploring its roots in all the spheres of life. Spielberger (1979), believed that work stress is one of the most important factors affecting productivity because of the direct relationship between the individual's behaviour and the stress he or she experiences. There are two ways to explore stress that it is an unwanted situation which generates stress reaction and to overcome stress, there is formation of inner capacities, coping strategies, new ideas and different judgments to control stress reactions (Spielberger, 1979). Kyriacou and Sutcliffe (1978) revealed that among different professions, teachers had been identified as those who work under high stress. Cox and Brockley (1984) also studied that teaching profession had the highest level of stress. Kalker (1984) also identified the following sources of teacher stress: poor public image, low salaries, student indiscipline, classroom crowding, limited resources and lack of support from school administrators and parents. Chaplain (1995) pointed out the biographical factors with regard to job stress in UK primary schools and found significant differences between men and women, teachers of different ages and length of teaching experience. In teaching profession, the sources of stress are daily interaction with students, parents and co-workers (DeRabbio and Iwanicki, 1996; Brotheridge and Grandly, 2002), inadequate administrative support, poor working conditions, lack of participation in decision making, burden of paper work, lack of resources, lack of social and recreational activities (Singh, 2005).

Murphy (1979) defined organisational stress as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources or needs of the worker; it can lead to poor health and even injury. Srivastava and Pareek (2008) measured organisational role stress by including more role stressors named as role under-load, inter role distance, role stagnation, role expectation conflict, role erosion, role overload, role isolation, personal inadequacy, self-role distance, role ambiguity and resource inadequacy.

Organisational role stress is considered to be a very serious problem among today’s teachers. Teachers are the most valued assets of any country. They provide knowledge and skills to the students. But, the global changes raises new challenges i.e. global competition, technological advancements, quality assurance, standardization etc. which affect each and every sector throughout world even the educational sector. The effects of teacher’s stress on the performance have widely been recognized.

Statement of the Problem:

“Organizational Role Stress In Relation To Teaching Experience” Objective:

Following will be the objective of the study:

-To study dimensions of organizational role stress among college teachers of Patiala District in relation to teaching experience.

Hypotheses:

To fulfill the above stated objective of the study, the following hypotheses was formulated:

-There exists no significant relationship between organizational role stress among college teachers of Patiala District in relation to teaching experience.

Delimitations:

The proposed study was delimited in the following manner:

1. The universe of the study will be college teachers of Patiala district of Punjab only.
2. Only college teachers will be selected for the conduct of the study.

Methodology:

The descriptive survey method will be used for the conduct of the present study.

Sampling:

The sample constituted 200 college teachers selected from Patiala District of Punjab only.

Research Tool:

-The following tools will be used to collect data for the present investigation: Organizational Role Stress (ORS) scale by Udai Pareek (1982).

Findings:

The table-I showed the correlation between teaching experiences with sub-dimensions of organizational role stress.

Table-I

Organizational Role Stress(ORS) In Relation to Teaching Experience

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*p>.05, **p>.01

The objective of the study was to examine the relationship of organizational role stress with teaching experience. The table-I showed the correlation matrix of teaching experience with ten sub-dimensions of organizational role stress. It is evident from the table that all the values of sub-dimensions of organizational role stress came out to be significant at 0.05 level and the dimensions namely role stagnation, role overload, role isolation, personal inadequacy and role ambiguity significant even at 0.01 level. Thus, the hypothesis stated, “There exists no significant relationship between organizational role stress among college teachers of Patiala District in relation to teaching experience” stands rejected. The result revealed that as the teaching experience increases this inturn decreases stress on teachers. Young and unexperienced faculty feel more organizational role stress as compared to aged and experienced faculty members.

References:

Beehr, T. A., & Newman, V. E. (1978). Job stress, employee health organization effectiveness: A facet analysis model and literature review. Personnel Psychology, 31 (4), 665-669.

Brotheridge, C. M., & Grandly, A. A. (2002). Emotional Intelligence and Burnout: comparing two perspectives of ‘people work’. Journal of Vocational Behaviour, 60, 17-39.

Chaplain, R. (1995), Stress and job satisfaction: a study of English primary school teachers. Educational Psychology, 15 (4), 473-489.

Cox, T., & Brockley, T. (1984). The Experience and Effects of Stress in Teachers. British Educational Research Journal, 10 (1), 83-87.

DeRabbio, R. A., & Iwanicki, E. F. (1996). Factors accounting for burnout among secondary school teachers. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New York.

Kalker, P. (1984). Teacher stress and burnout: causes and coping strategies. Contemporary Education, 56, 16-19.

Kyriacou, C., & Sutcliffe, J. (1978). Teacher Stress: prevalence, sources and symptoms. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 48, 159-167.

Kyriacou, C., & Sutcliffe, J. (1978). A model of teacher stress. Educational Studies, 4, 1-6.

Murphy, S. L. (1979). Occupational Stress Issues & Development in Research. New York: McGraw-Hill Inc.

Pareek, U. (1982). Organizational Role Stress Scales (manual, scale, answer sheet). Ahmedabad: Navin Publications.

Pareek, U. (1983). Organizational Role Stress. In L. D. Goodstein and J. W. Pfeiffer (Eds.). The 1983 annual (115-123). San Diego, CA: University Associates. In A. K. Srivastav (2010). Heterogeneity of Role Stress. Research and Practice in Human Resource Management, 18(1), 16-27. Retrieved December 3, 2015, from http://rphrm.curtin.edu.au/2010/issue1/role_stress.html

Pareek, U. (1983). Organizational Role Stress Scale. Research Report. Ahmedabad: Indian Institute of Management.

Pareek, U. (1983). Role Stress Scale: ORS scales booklet, answer sheet, and manual. Ahmadabad: Naveen Publications. In B. Bano and R. K. Jha (2012) . Organizational role stress among public and private sector employees: A comparative study. The Lahore Journal of Business 1(1), 23-36.

Pareek, U. (1983). Organizational Role Stress. In L. D. Goodstein and J. W. Pfeiffer (Eds.). The 1983 annual (115-123). San Diego, CA: University Associates.

Pareek, U. (1993). Making organizational roles effective. Tata McGraw-Hill: New Delhi.

Selye, H. (1936). A syndrome produced by diverse noxious agents. Nature, 138, 32-35. In B. Bano and R. K. Jha (2012) . Organizational Role Stress Among Public and Private Sector Employees: A Comparative Study. The Lahore Journal of Business, 1 (1), 23-36.

Selye, H. (1956). The stress of life. McGraw Hills: New York.

Selye, H. (1956). General Adaptation Syndrome. Stress and Coping: The Indian Experience. Second Edition, (2004), Sage Publications. Pp. 19-20.

Spielberger, C. D. (1979). Understanding stress and anxiety. New York: Harper & Row.

Srivastav, A. K., & Pareek, U. (2008). Measurement of stress in organizational roles: Revalidating the framework. In E. Biech (Ed.). The 2008 Pfeiffer annual: Training (187-208). San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

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Details

Seiten
6
Jahr
2016
ISBN (eBook)
9783668305526
Dateigröße
401 KB
Sprache
Englisch
Katalognummer
v340652
Note
Schlagworte
stress teaching experience role stress organizational stress teaching profession

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Titel: Organizational Role Stress In Relation To Teaching Experiences