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Assessment on the quality of mathematics test questionnaires

Akademische Arbeit 2017 17 Seiten

Pädagogik - Bewertungsmethoden, Noten

Leseprobe

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Abstract

Chapter I
The Problem and Its Scope
Introduction

Chapter 2
Research Methodology
Research Design
Research Environment
Research Subject
Research Instruments
Data Gathering Procedure
Statistical Treatment

Chapter 3
Results and Discussion

Chapter 4
Summary of Findings, Conclusion and Recommendations
Summary of Findings

Conclusion

Recommendation

References

Abstract

The main objective of this study is to assess the quality of the periodical test questionnaires in Mathematics as basis in conducting an in-service training on test construction.

Results show that the respondents agree that they have constructed test that focuses on the most important content and behaviors and that the items are clear and concise, with simple, declarative sentence structures; that there are enough items that best measure the important content and behaviors. They are undecided in terms of the appropriateness of the language level, sentence structure, and vocabulary are considered in constructing assessment items as well as in the grouping of the items by same format (true-false, multiple choice, essay) or by content or topical area; undecided on constantly reviewing the test after a “cooling off” period to check relevance of the test, and preparing and providing students ahead with information on the test directions and about the test’s purpose, time allowed, procedures for responding to items and recording answers, and scoring/grading criteria. Generally, the respondents are undecided in terms of the validity and reliability of the test that they have constructed.

The respondents strongly agree that the test they have constructed has only one correct answer in each item and that they have made the options in the test as short as possible, that the stem only includes the information needed to make the problem clear and specific; that each item have at least three incorrect options which serve as distractors and the correct response are written with no irrelevant clues and that the distractors are written to be plausible yet clearly wrong and that the options "all of the above," "none of the above," or other special distractors are avoided. They are undecided in terms of the negative statements are not avoided and that alternatives are used as the correct answer about the same number of times in the test.

Mathematics teachers of Lala National High School agreed that they need an in-service training on test construction.

Chapter I

The Problem and Its Scope

Introduction

Education completes a man. Students need quality education suitable for life. Perceiving the needs of the learners, appropriate changes are made in the curriculum, syllabus and textbook on a need basis. Currently, changes have taken place in the evaluation system. The long practiced marking scheme has been done away with and the grading system has been brought in its place. The students are assessed not only during examinations; but, all through the term. Evaluation is conducted through activities, observation and group discussions. The evaluation is done under two parts, namely scholastic and co-scholastic activities (A, V. C., & Jeyasekaran, 2016).

The emerging paradigm shift from “learning” to “lifelong learning” is overwhelmingly posited as a necessary response to the condition of knowledge explosion in current times of change. It is not enough to finish the basic education anymore. What is important is that one continues to learn even after formal schooling (Su, 2015).

The summative or cumulative assessment is performed at the end of a set of learning activities (a theme, a chapter, a unit of learning). It is associated to the traditional way of checking students' training, it highlights the acquisitions and sanctions their absence or the errors found. It aims the periodic balance of learning activities and highlights the results expressed in grades through which selections or classifications are made. Summative assessment certifies to what extent the students at the end of a period of learning, have acquired the expected learning outcomes (Crisan, 2017).

It is important to ask whether during the educational process in case of the representatives of the young generation we really assess what they will need for their future. Are the assessment tools for monitoring and providing feedback on processes that have been applied so far appropriate and sufficient?

Policymakers wish to know what changes must be made to the primary and secondary education system so that when students apply to college they are highly prepared, ready to perform at high levels, and likely to be successful in college.

Review of Related Literature

Evaluation is the structured interpretation and giving of meaning to predict the actual impacts of proposals or results. Evaluation can be characterized as being either formative or summative. Formative evaluation takes place in the lead up to the project, as well as during the project in order to improve the project design as it is being implemented. Formative evaluation often lends itself to the qualitative methods of inquiry (A, V. C., & Jeyasekaran, 2016).

Effectiveness of continuous assessment can be judged by making observation and collecting information periodically from specific tasks given to students during their learning process. Assessment of learning is not one time movement, it is a progressing process. It includes the procedure of checking on, reflecting and modifying the learning techniques in an arranged and cautious way. Continuous assessment is part and parcel of instructional process that has to be taken as a key tool in educational quality assurance endeavor (Abejehu, 2016).

In the changed conditions of the educational environment, learners’ skills often go beyond even teachers’ expectations. Some of the competencies of students cannot be implemented in the narrow cross-section of school subjects, and therefore remain hidden forever, even from the teacher. The practices of school experience demonstrate that assessment is limited to the classification of results in accordance with the requirements of the curriculum and educational standards and only a superficial picture of the real abilities and skills of pupils in a particular subject is provided (Szarka & Puskas, 2017).

The most obvious function of assessment methods such as exams, quizzes, papers, presentations, etc., is to enable instructors to make judgments about the quality of student learning (i.e., assign grades). However, the methods of assessment used by faculty can also have a direct impact on the quality of student learning. Students assume that the focus of exams and assignments reflects the educational goals most valued by an instructor, and they direct their learning and studying. Given the importance of assessment for both faculty and student interactions about learning, how can instructors develop exams that provide useful and relevant data about their students' learning and also direct students to spend their time on the important aspects of a course or course unit? How do grading practices further influence this process? As cited by Piontek (2017).

Ideally, effective exams have four characteristics. They are valid (providing useful information about the concepts they were designed to test), reliable (allowing consistent measurement and discriminating between different levels of performance), recognizable (instruction has prepared students for the assessment), and realistic (concerning time and effort required to complete the assignment).

Statement of the Problem

The main objective of this study was to determine quality of the Mathematics test questionnaires constructed by the Math teachers themselves. More specifically, the study sought to answer the following questions:

1. What is the quality of the Mathematics test questionnaires in terms of:

a. Validity and Reliability
b. Multiple-choice Test Standards

2. Is there a need to conduct an In-service training on Test Construction?

Conceptual Framework

This study wanted to investigate the respondents’ perception on the quality of the test questionnaires in Mathematics that they have constructed. The results of the study became a basis in conducting the In-service training on Test Construction. Figure 1 below illustrates the conceptual framework of the study.

illustration not visible in this excerpt

Figure 1. Conceptual Framework

Scope and Limitation

This study was conducted at Lala National High School, Maranding, Lala, Lanao del Norte. The respondents of the study were the sixteen (16) mathematics teaching personnel of the said school. This study only looked into the assessment of the existing test questionnaires that the teachers have constructed and determine they quality of this test questionnaires in terms of its validity and reliability and on the conformity on multiple choice test standards.

Chapter 2

Research Methodology

This chapter illustrates the research methodology of the study. It includes discussion on the research design and research methods covering the research environment, research subjects, sampling techniques, instrumentation, data gathering techniques, and statistical treatment.

Research Design

This study was a descriptive action research design in which a researcher-made questionnaire was used to assess the quality of the mathematics test questionnaires that the teachers of Lala National High School have constructed. The study also aimed at conducting an In-service training on Test Construction to improve the skills of the teachers so that they can produce better assessment tools.

Research Environment

The research was conducted at Lala National High School. "Lala" means a wide plain which fittingly describes the topography and terrain of the place. In the Christian version, the term "Lala" means deadly. The place of Lala evidently possesses a natural charisma considering that not only Christians from the Visayan and Luzon regions were attracted to the place but to include the Americans and to name the few, they were the Kids, the Kellogs, the Newmans, the MaCarthys, the Bolts, the Morgans, the Kelleys and others. Maranding was strategically located at the crossroads of the national highway and the provincial road, to the municipality of Salvador-Maranding become the new center of the social, economic and political activities of this municipality. Nowhere in any part of the country where we can find so unique situation where the seat of government of Lala is not in the barangay of Lala Proper, but in barangay Lanipao, while the center of population and business is located in Barangay Maranding.

Research Subject

The subjects of this study were 16 mathematics faculty members of the Lala National High School, Maranding, Lala, Lanao del Norte. These faulty members were selected as respondents of the study because they have the full load in mathematics. Other part-time mathematics teachers were not included in this study.

Research Instruments

This study uses a researcher-made questionnaire which was pilot tested and scored an 88% reliability. This was enough to ensure that the test can be implemented. The instrument was used as an assessment tool in determining the quality of mathematics test questionnaires for periodical examinations. The questionnaire is divided into three parts. The first part contains 7 statements that has something to do with the validity and reliability of the test. The respondents rated each statement based on a Likert scale of 1-5, were 1 is the lowest and 5 as the highest rating. The second part also uses the same scaling as that of part 1. This part contains statements that pertain to the multiple-choice type of test standards. The last part is an essay part were the respondents were asked to provide their suggestions as to the importance or the need in conducting an In-service training on Test Construction.

Data Gathering Procedure

The researcher conducted the survey by giving out the questionnaire to all the 16 Mathematics faculty members of Lala National High School. After the survey questionnaire were answered by the respondents, The researcher then gather and collate the answers of the respondents and apply necessary statistical tools in order to interpret the data..

Statistical Treatment

The statistical processes that were performed in this investigation was the mean test. The average rating of the respondents to each statement was computed and was matched with its equivalent description. This allowed the researcher to gather more strength with each passing time.

Chapter 3

Results and Discussion

This chapter includes the presentation and analysis of the data gathered. The data are presented in tabular form and discussion immediately follows the table.

Table 1.A Valid and Reliable Test

illustration not visible in this excerpt

Hypothetical Range:

1 - 1.79 Strongly Disagree 2.60 – 3.39 Undecided 4.20 – 5 – Strongly Agree

1.80 - 2.59 Disagree 3.40 – 4.19 Agree

Table 1.A illustrates the perception of the respondents in terms of the content validity and reliability of the test that they have constructed in the past. Results show that they agree that the test questionnaire they have constructed focuses on the most important content and behaviors that they emphasized during the grading period, the items are clear and concise, with simple, declarative sentence structures, and that there are enough items that best measure the important content and behaviors. Results also show that they are undecided in terms of the appropriateness of the language level, sentence structure, and vocabulary are considered in constructing assessment items, grouping of the items by same format (true-false, multiple choice, essay) or by content or topical area, constantly reviewing the test after a “cooling off” period to check relevance of the test, and preparing and providing students ahead with information on the test directions and about the test’s purpose, time allowed, procedures for responding to items and recording answers, and scoring/grading criteria. The overall mean rating is 3.37 which implies that the respondents are generally undecided in terms of the validity and reliability of the test that they have constructed.

Table 1.B Multiple Choice Test Standard

illustration not visible in this excerpt

Hypothetical Range:

1 - 1.79 Strongly Disagree 2.60 – 3.39 Undecided 4.20 – 5 – Strongly Agree

1.80 - 2.59 Disagree 3.40 – 4.19 Agree

Table 1.B contains the Multiple Choice Test standards. Results show that the respondents strongly agree that the test they have constructed has only one correct answer in each item. Results also show that, the respondents agree that the they have made the options in the test as short as possible, that the stem only includes the information needed to make the problem clear and specific, that each item have at least three incorrect options which serve as distractors, that the correct response are written with no irrelevant clues, that the distractors are written to be plausible yet clearly wrong and that the options "all of the above," "none of the above," or other special distractors are avoided. Moreover, results further show that they are undecided in terms of the negative statements are not avoided and that alternatives are used as the correct answer about the same number of times in the test.

All of the 16 Mathematics teachers of Lala National High School agreed that they need an in-service training on test construction for the following reasons: a) they need to improve the quality of their test, b) they need to learn the standards of test construction and c) they need to grow professionally and make better assessment tools.

Chapter 4

Summary of Findings, Conclusion and Recommendations

This chapter shows the summary of findings, conclusions and recommendations.

Summary of Findings

Based on the interpretation of the data the following are the summary:

1. They agree that the test they have constructed focuses on the most important content and behaviors that they emphasized during the grading period.
2. They agree that the items are clear and concise, with simple, declarative sentence structures, and that there are enough items that best measure the important content and behaviors.
3. They are undecided in terms of the appropriateness of the language level, sentence structure, and vocabulary are considered in constructing assessment items
4. They are also undecided in the grouping of the items by same format (true-false, multiple choice, essay) or by content or topical area.
5. They are undecided on constantly reviewing the test after a “cooling off” period to check relevance of the test, and preparing and providing students ahead with information on the test directions and about the test’s purpose, time allowed, procedures for responding to items and recording answers, and scoring/grading criteria.
6. The overall mean rating is 3.37 which implies that the respondents are generally undecided in terms of the validity and reliability of the test that they have constructed.
7. The respondents strongly agree that the test they have constructed has only one correct answer in each item.
8. The respondents agree that the they have made the options in the test as short as possible, that the stem only includes the information needed to make the problem clear and specific.
9. They agree that each item have at least three incorrect options which serve as distractors.
10. They agree that the correct response are written with no irrelevant clues and that the distractors are written to be plausible yet clearly wrong and that the options "all of the above," "none of the above," or other special distractors are avoided.
11. They are undecided in terms of the negative statements are not avoided and that alternatives are used as the correct answer about the same number of times in the test.
12. All of the 16 Mathematics teachers of Lala National High School agreed that they need an in-service training on test construction for the following reasons: a) they need to improve the quality of their test, b) they need to learn the standards of test construction and c) they need to grow professionally and make better assessment tools.

Conclusion

Based on the summary of findings, the following conclusions are formulated:

They agree that the test they have constructed focuses on the most important content and behaviors that they emphasized during the grading period and that the items are clear and concise, with simple, declarative sentence structures. They also agree that there are enough items that best measure the important content and behaviors. They are undecided in terms of the appropriateness of the language level, sentence structure, and vocabulary are considered in constructing assessment items as well as in the grouping of the items by same format (true-false, multiple choice, essay) or by content or topical area. They are undecided on constantly reviewing the test after a “cooling off” period to check relevance of the test, and preparing and providing students ahead with information on the test directions and about the test’s purpose, time allowed, procedures for responding to items and recording answers, and scoring/grading criteria. Generally, the respondents are undecided in terms of the validity and reliability of the test that they have constructed.

The respondents strongly agree that the test they have constructed has only one correct answer in each item and that they have made the options in the test as short as possible, that the stem only includes the information needed to make the problem clear and specific. They also agree that each item have at least three incorrect options which serve as distractors and the correct response are written with no irrelevant clues and that the distractors are written to be plausible yet clearly wrong and that the options "all of the above," "none of the above," or other special distractors are avoided. They are undecided in terms of the negative statements are not avoided and that alternatives are used as the correct answer about the same number of times in the test.

All of the 16 Mathematics teachers of Lala National High School agreed that they need an in-service training on test construction for the following reasons: a) they need to improve the quality of their test, b) they need to learn the standards of test construction and c) they need to grow professionally and make better assessment tools.

Recommendation

Based on the conclusions above, the following recommendations are formulated:

1. An in-service training on test construction be conducted to enhance the quality of test questionnaires.
2. Assessment on the quality of test questionnaires in the different subject areas be conducted to determine the quality of their test questionnaire.
3. Further study may be conducted that will assess the test questionnaire that include other types of test.

References

Abejehu, S.B. (2016). The practice of contuous assessment in primary schools: The case of Chagni, Ethiopia. Journal of Education and Pratice, 7(13).

A, V. C., & Jeyasekaran, D. (2016). Attitude towards continuous and comprehensive evaluation of high school students. I-Manager's Journal on Educational Psychology, 9(4), 21-26. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1803218740?accountid=149218

Crisan, A. N. (2017). Case study on the importance of formative assessment in stimulating student motivation for learning and increasing the efficiency of the educational process. Journal of Educational Sciences and Psychology, Ii (lxix)(1) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1908419273?accountid=149218

Croft, S. J., Roberts, M. A., & Stenhouse, V. L. (2016). The perfect storm of education reform: High-stakes testing and teacher evaluation. Social Justice, 42(1), 70-92,147. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1744924996?accountid=149218

Iqbal, M., Samiullah, & Anjum, A. (2017). Effect of continuous assessment techniques on students' performance at elementary level. Bulletin of Education and Research, 39(1) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1944194325?accountid=149218

Kikas, E., & Jõgi, A. (2016). Assessment of learning strategies: Self-report questionnaire or learning task. European Journal of Psychology of Education, 31(4), 579-593. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10212-015-0276-3

Piontek, Mary E., BEST PRACTICES FOR DESIGNING AND GRADING EXAMS, Center for Research on Learning and Teaching, University of Michigan, No. 24

Su, Y. (2015). Ensuring the continuum of learning: The role of assessment for lifelong learning. International Review of Education, 61(1), 7-20. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11159-015-9465-1

Szarka, K., & Puskás, A. (2017). THE ANALYSIS OF SELECTED ATTITUDES OF TEACHERS IN THE PROCESS OF ASSESSING STUDENTS' LEARNING OUTCOMES AND ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING. Education and Science without Borders, 8(15), 56-61. Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1900328691?accountid=149218

Details

Seiten
17
Jahr
2017
ISBN (Buch)
9783668591578
Dateigröße
856 KB
Sprache
Englisch
Katalognummer
v381299
Institution / Hochschule
La Salle University
Note
12
Schlagworte
Assessment Assessment in Mathematics test test questionnaire tq quality of Test quality of TQ

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Titel: Assessment on the quality of mathematics test questionnaires